EtherNet/IP FAQ

EtherNet/IP FAQ

Alicat devices are compatible with a variety of analog, serial, or industrial communication protocols for easy data collection and analysis. Options include analog (4-20 mA, 0-10 Vdc, 0-5 Vdc, or 1-5 Vdc), ASCII and Modbus RTU over RS-232, ASCII and Modbus RTU over RS-485, Profibus, DeviceNet, EtherNet/IP, Modbus TCP/IP, and EtherCAT.

In this article, we provide answers to common questions about EtherNet/IP.

Where can I find supporting download files?

Find supporting downloads such as EDS files, add-on instructions, and the ODVA declaration of conformity here.

Which products can have EtherNet/IP installed?

EtherCAT is available on most of Alicat mass flow and pressure devices:

Exceptions (incompatible with EtherNet/IP):

How does EtherNet/IP change instrument specifications?
  • Alicat part number: -EIP
  • Electrical connections: Comms over dual RJ45
  • Additional power requirement: 120 mA
  • Software compatibility: LabVIEW
  • Max number of devices on network: No limit
Do I still have a choice of gases and gas mixes on EtherNet/IP instruments?

Yes. Gas instruments with EtherCAT have the full Gas Select™ list of gas calibrations and Composer™ gas mixing firmware.

How fast are communications with an Alicat instrument equipped with EtherNet/IP?

EtherNet/IP uses a full duplex 10/100 Ethernet hardware layer for data rates up to 100 mbit/s.

Where are the notification indicator lights?

The MOD and NET LEDs are standards in debugging EtherNet/IP networks. They are located on the case top.

Does EtherNet/IP on Alicat instruments comply with the industry standard?

The instruments are EtherNet/IP compatible and ODVA certified.

Can I update my existing instruments to possess EtherNet/IP?

No. EtherNet/IP can only be ordered on new instruments due to the hardware and firmware requirements during installation.

*What is DLR?

DLR: Device Level Ring. Device Level Ring provides the ability to connect a series of mass flow controllers (MFCs) in a fault-tolerant ring network. It is a network topology wherein connections are made from the master to an MFC, then from MFC to MFC to MFC. DLR often reduces cabling, and adds redundancy. DLR requires a specialized ring supervisor switch, which is not provided with the instrument.

Contact an applications engineer for support